#NastyWoman: Inside the spread of feminist merchandise on Instagram

When Donald Trump muttered a loaded insult at Hillary Clinton during a presidential debate in October, Amanda Brinkman took the opportunity to reverse the narrative and print the phrase on a T-shirt, turning it into a badge of honor.

“Nasty Woman” shirts, which display the words in capital letters over a pink heart, went up for sale that night on Brinkman’s “Google Ghost” Shopify page — which houses the results of her T-shirt printing side hobby — with 50 percent of their proceeds to be donated to Planned Parenthood. She posted an image of one of the tees to her personal Instagram and the @googleghostpress Instagram simultaneously. Overnight, thousands of them were ordered.

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