Coke Turns Fans into 3D-Printed Figurines

Coca-Cola is making personalization a big push.

First it was Coke bottles with your name on them, then it was a personalized highway billboard. Now Coca-Cola is taking its personalization of its brand for its fans one step further. To promote its new mini-bottles in Israel, Coke — with the help of agency Gefen Team — is using 3D printing to let fans make mini figurines of themselves.

For the “Mini-Me” campaign Coke invited a few lucky fans to its main factory in Israel to have 3D-printed versions of themselves made. In order to get the chance to go to the factory for the 3D printing, fans had to download a special mini-me mobile app and create digital mini versions of themselves, which they had to take care of Tamagotchi style — like going grocery shopping to feed it.

Winner were chosen from those who participated in the app mini-me game and were invited to the Coke factory to have their 3D-printed mini versions of themselves made. Participants got a special full-body scan to make the blueprints for their 3D-printed mini figurines, which were then printed on-site.

It’s a neat campaign that gives people — well, at least a few people — access to a hot, new technology. The app is a nice way to add an experience for many more people.

Watch the video to see the Mini-Me process.

https://digiday.com/?p=47686

More in Marketing

Why — and how — ESL/FACEIT Group is spinning up its own esports streaming platform

Esports companies are still trying to figure out how to make competitive gaming profitable, and it’s encouraging news for a major league operator to dip its toes into the livestreaming game in order to more effectively monetize its core product. But EFG’s announcement also raises questions about the technology powering the venture. 

Person gaming

Candy giant Butterfinger doubles down on gaming with streamers and creators to reach younger audiences

Candy brand Butterfinger is making a bigger bet on gaming, increasing its media spend this year on gaming creators and streamers to boost brand awareness with younger shoppers.

Amazon wants a bigger slice of the DSP ad tech market

Over the last year or so, ad execs have noted how much Amazon’s ad tech has changed to become omnichannel in nature — i.e. more of a competitor to the two largest DSPs: The Trade Desk and Google’s DV360.