Infographic: Don’t Blame Pseudonyms

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While pro-real-namers say that pseudonymity encourages bad online behavior, new data from social commenting platform Disqus suggests otherwise.

The data shows that across sites that use Disqus, comments left by people with pseudonyms receive more likes and replies than those left both by people using only their real names and those who are completely anonymous. Furthermore, pseudonymous commenters make up the majority of comments: 61 percent of comments are made by users using made-up names. That is in comparison to 35 percent of comments left by anonymous users and only 4 percent by people using their real names. So much for real names!

See the full results from Disqus below.

https://digiday.com/?p=3159

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