Chase is using memes and GIFs to bring millennials to Zelle

JPMorgan is focusing its Zelle efforts on millennials, despite the platform outwardly claiming it’s not targeting that age group.

Chase will soon roll out an animated GIF campaign on social media as the second part of its Quick Pay with Zelle campaign. Part one launched last weekend during the Grammy awards, during which the bank ran a 30-second television commercial starring Sierra Leonean ballerina Michaela DePrince, Chase’s next “Master” after Serena Williams and Steph Curry.

But the meme concept is something the bank hasn’t ever really done before – at least not at scale — and signals a necessary shift in banks’ digital marketing and messaging to customers as their interactions with every other brand become faster, more personalized, more relevant and more meaningful.

“What changes is how you connect,” said Donna Vieira, chief marketing officer for Chase’s consumer bank. “The channels, mediums and media you use; the copy and creative form like memes and GIFs. Clearly 15 years ago this would be nonexistent, but it’s how this audience communicates with each other, tells their stories and what they find engaging.”

Read the full story on Tearsheet.co

https://digiday.com/?p=274144

More in Media

With Firefly Image 3, Adobe aims to integrate more AI tools for various apps

New tools let people make images in seconds, create image backgrounds, replacing parts of an image and use reference images to create with AI.

Publishers revamp their newsletter offerings to engage audiences amid threat of AI and declining referral traffic

Publishers like Axios, Eater, the Guardian, theSkimm and Snopes are either growing or revamping their newsletter offerings to engage audiences as a wave of generative AI advancements increases the need for original content and referral traffic declines push publishers to find alternative ways to reach readers.

The Guardian US is starting its pursuit of political ad dollars

The Guardian US is entering the race for political ad dollars.