Confessions of a fashion designer: US production is ‘not a serious option’

This article is part of our Confessions series, in which we trade anonymity for candor to get an unvarnished look at the people, processes and problems inside the industry. More from the series →

U.S. fashion brands that choose to remain “American-made” are becoming something of a rarity.

While some brands try to produce solely in America, many clothing labels are turning to offshore factories, motivated by cheaper manufacturing and labor costs and the ability to easily scale production. The shift away from Amercian-made fashion has largely occurred in the past fifty years: In 1965, 95 percent of all American clothing was made in the U.S. Today, that number has tumbled to just two percent.

In Glossy’s latest edition of Confessions, where we grant anonymity for honesty, we speak to a senior designer at a contemporary fashion label that produces all of its products overseas. To read the full story, visit Glossy.co.

https://digiday.com/?p=211305

More in Marketing

Manchester City uses Fortnite to expand its global audience

As Manchester City rolls out its own Fortnite experience, it will have to contend with the fact that this brand new world does not come with a pre-existing user base. To address this problem, the company plans to leverage its network of players and talent to spread the word across their social feeds.

How Chipotle’s fighting-game-focused esports strategy is paying off at Evo 2024

In 2024, Chipotle’s choice to court the relatively niche fighting game community appears to have paid off. According to a joint study by YouGov and the agency rEvolution, which helped develop Chipotle’s gaming strategy, U.S. esports fans between the ages of 18 and 44 reported a nearly 100% increase in their intent to purchase Chipotle following the brand’s esports campaign last year.

How Revolut’s creator strategy is benefitting from YouTube’s long-form swing

The challenger bank is prioritizing YouTube creators in bid to reach consumers.