The Signal: Cell Phone Not Carcinogenic?

Cell Phones and Cancer?: Seems like everyday there is a new study suggesting that cell phones are linked to cancer one way or another; but there are never any hard, definite findings that confirm that cell phones are cancer causing. Now, to add more confusion to the mix, a recrnt review of previously published research by a committee of experts from Britain, the United States and Sweden concluded there was no convincing evidence that mobile phones cause cancer. Reuters

Text Generation: It’s no secret that teens love texting, and it’s not just them. Mobile phones and smartphones have changed the way we all communicate on a day-to-day basis.  Check out this infographic. Mashable

Samsung vs. Apple: This tit-for-tat patent-infringement battle between Samsung and Apple is really getting old. At least this time instead of escalating the conflict, Samsung is dropping one of its counter-suits against Apple.  Bloomberg

iPad Traffic: According to NetMarketShare report, iPads account for more than 1 percent of all global web traffic. That’s no small feat for a single device. AllThingsD

iPhone 5 Rumors: While most of these iPhone 5 rumors haven’t really been confirmed, it looks like at least one thing is certain: 15 million iPhone 5s will be set to ship out by September. TechCrunch

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