Dreading school? Sonic sums up summer reading classics in 10 words

Summer reading lists are the worst, aren’t they? Who wants to actually, like, think during break?

Yet schools across America assign kids laundry lists of books to slog through like “1984” and “The Scarlet Letter,” assignments that suck the fun right out of summer.

Screen Shot 2014-08-28 at 12.16.22 PM

Sonic, which has plumbed classic Americana with high-tech drive-ins and magical ice slushies, recently shared a Facebook post so perfectly attuned to the reading-list blues that it’s likely to give you an ice cream headache: Give the brand the title of a book you were supposed to have read, and it will give you a 10-word recap.

The brand’s Facebook fans wasted little time flooding the page with hundreds of comments asking for summaries of books from “The Giver” to “A Clockwork Orange,” “1984” and, yes, “50 Shades of Grey.” The results won’t earn students an A on a book report, but they’re sly and reward the more dialed-in reader. Kudos to a brand for not playing it dumb.

Here are some of the better ones:

Great Expectations
“Expections =/= reality. Sometimes that’s great, sometimes it’s not. London.”

Hamlet
“Wants revenge for his father’s death, goes a little overboard.”

The Giver
“Jonas turns 12, discovers there’s more to life than safety.”

A Clockwork Orange
“Futuristic totalitarian society. Violence, violence, violence.”

Dracula
“If you think someone’s a vampire, don’t secondguess. Just run.”

Lord of the Flies
“Buncha kids + island. Not as fun as it sounds.”

To Kill a Mockingbird
“People are only scared of what they don’t understand.”

Metamorphosis
“Man turns into bug, becomes big burden to family.”

50 Shades of Grey
“Nice try. There’s no way you’re reading that for school.”

https://digiday.com/?p=86358

More in Marketing

Inside X’s latest, desperate attempt to beguile advertisers

If X has its way, 2024 will be the year it hits the long, twisted trail back to advertiser land, according to the platform’s pitch deck.

How Amazon Prime’s ‘Fallout’ series highlights the power of post-apocalyptic video game IP

To some extent, the mainstream success of the “Fallout” series is a reflection of the massive scale of the Amazon Prime machine. But the consensus among viewers and critics is that it’s a damn good show, too.

Why the New York Times is forging connections with gamers as it diversifies its audience

The New York Times is not becoming a gaming company. But as it continues to diversify its editorial offerings for the digital era, the Times has embraced puzzle gamers as one of its core captive audiences, and it is taking ample advantage of its advantageous positioning in the space in 2024.