Why BMW’s Best in Class on YouTube

The auto industry has always been known for its dependance on sight, sound and motion to tell a story. Traditionally, car makers have been relying on TV to speak to the masses. But with the growth in online video consumption, especially on YouTube, car makers have been moving dollars to online video. Auto brands like BMW, Ford and Chevy have set up shop on YouTube, with channels dedicated to housing their video content.

Digiday asked OpenSlate, a company that gives quality rankings to YouTube channels, to do a comparative analysis of auto YouTube channels. Based on various metrics, OpenSlate scores each brand. They’re like credit scores based on the reach and engagement. As you can see below, size does not matter in the Slate score, as the companies with the most subscribers aren’t necessarily getting the highest score.

https://digiday.com/?p=19302

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