The White House’s Best Digital Marketing

The Obama administration is no stranger to digital media. In fact, it is kind of awesome at it.

Besides all of the expected social media stuff, the Obama staff has been on top of what’s new and important in the digital world and actively uses new digital platforms and technology to better engage and interact with the public. Marketers, take note of these impressive ways the White House has used digital media.

End Gun Violence Site: The new site for Obama’s gun control proposal is incredibly well designed. Much like the raved-about New York Times’ “Snow Fall” feature, this new site includes experiential design that creates a seamless experience. For example, as you scroll down the page, different videos of Obama speaking about gun control start and stop as you move down, and there is a cinemagraph (an image where only part of it moves) at the top of the page with the American flag blowing in the wind at half-mast on top of the White House. This is all pretty cutting-edge stuff as far as site design goes. 

 

 
We the People: The Obama administration started the We the People site to give the public a place to directly and digitally petition the government on issues they care about. The easy-to-use platform lets anyone start their own petition or get behind other people’s causes. 

 

Viral Images: The Obama administration clearly understands the power of images and immediacy when it comes to the Internet and the social Web.  After Clint Eastwood’s bizarre empty chair speech at the Republican National Convention, the Obama staff quickly responded on Twitter with a picture of the president sitting in his chair with the caption: “This seat is taken.” The Obama campaign made GIFs for Obama’s Tumblr, like this Romney flip-flopping one. When silver-medal gymnast McKayla Maroney visited the White House, she and the president recreated the famous “McKayla is not impressed” meme, which they shared with the world via Twitter. All around great job using images to get people talking and sharing on the Web. 

(Image via mckaylaisnotimpressed.tumblr.com)

Google Plus Hangout: Obama was the first president to ever do a Google Plus Hangout. People got to live video chat with the president and ask him questions about drones, educational policies and even his plans for his wedding anniversary. It’s clear that the Obama staff embraces all digital platforms and tries to find a way to best try them out.

Spotify Inauguration Playlist: Now you can listen to a presidential playlist on Spotify — that’s definitely a first. The White House just released Obama’s inauguration playlist on the music platform, and it includes such tunes as Stevie Wonder’s “Sign, Sealed, Delivered” and Katy Perry’s “Firework.” Obama’s got an eclectic taste in music.

Reddit AMA: Reddit can be a sketchy place, and hosting an AMA (ask me anything) can be a risky thing to do considering all of the trolls and crazies that hang out on Reddit. But that didn’t deter Obama from hosting the first presidential AMA on the social media site. Pretty neat seeing the president introduce himself on Reddit

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