Instagram’s most-liked picture is a Coca-Cola ad with Selena Gomez

Congratulations are in order to the current queen of pop Selena Gomez for becoming the new queen of Instagram. She has the most-liked picture on the platform. The picture, however, isn’t a seductive selfie or a candid backstage picture, but is actually an ad for Coca-Cola.

when your lyrics are on the bottle

A photo posted by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on

Fans doubled tapped a picture of Gomez holding a Coca-Cola bottle that has lyrics from her song “Me & the Rhythm” on the bottle’s label more than 4 million times since it was posted two weeks ago. “When your lyrics are on the bottle,” the caption reads, although it’s missing a disclaimer that it’s an #ad.

Coca-Cola didn’t immediately respond for comment about the exciting news.

The 23-year-old is one of the faces in the brand’s “Share a Coke and a Song” campaign, calling the company “iconic” when it was first announced. “I try to be an authentic as possible with everything I do, so nothing is forced,” she told Billboard.

Gomez has garnered more than 89 million followers on Instagram, awarding her the title of being the most-followed person on the platform. “I’m not sure there’s a method to my madness,” Gomez told The Hollywood Reporter about her Instagram strategy. “If a caption isn’t coming to you, use emoji and ‘let it be.'”

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