Worth Reading: Vevo/YouTube Split?

Is Vevo ready to break up with YouTube? According to CNET’s Greg Sandoval, the two-year old music video company — a joint venture between Universal Music and Sony — has been talking to Facebook about switching teams. That’s a move that could have major ripple effects in the digital video industry.

It seems awfully risky for Vevo to chance losing YouTube’s traffic fire house. The company has been a tremendous media success story, but the Vevo brand is hardly a household name. While Vevo does have a popular app on Facebook’s Open Graph, expecting users to shift their music video watching to Facebook would represent a major behavioral shift.

As for Facebook, CNET sees a major upside, Sandoval writes:

If Vevo were to jump, Facebook could boost its music offering, which it has done only in incremental ways in recent months. In September, Facebook Music was launched, a service that enables users to share information about their listening habits and tastes in real time.
Last week, the social network expanded on that with a new music-sharing feature. Facebook’s “Listen With” button enables users who subscribe to Spotify, Rdio, and MOG to listen to the same song at the same point in the song with friends and chat about the music. But there’s still no real compelling Facebook-driven music service.
Here’s the most compelling thing a Vevo deal could offer Facebook: CEO Mark Zuckerberg could offer free-music listening in the form of music videos–just like YouTube does now–to the company’s users. That would certainly help Facebook keep users on the site longer, something the company is determined to do.

https://digiday.com/?p=5020
Digiday Top Stories
  • Eyeview becomes the latest ad tech casualty

    Eyeview, which raised around $80 million in funding, told its 100 employees the company would shut.

  • Video: WTF is Apple’s privacy update?

    Digiday senior reporter Tim Peterson breaks down Apple's new privacy update.

    ad attribution
  • Online music videos get official age ratings in UK, the US could be next

    Online music videos will now receive age ratings in the same way films do in the U.K. as part of a government-led pilot. The Department of Culture Media and Sport has brought together U.K. record labels, Sony, Universal and Warner Music, along with platforms YouTube and Vevo, ratings body BBFC and record label trade body BPI to crack down on the amount of unsuitable music content seen by children online.

  • Content marketers share their biggest mistakes and failures

    At the Digiday Content Marketing Summit, in Half Moon Bay, California, this week, we asked the cream of the content marketing crop what to share their biggest mistakes. Hasbro's Tina Walsh likened a failed call for user-generated content to "throwing a party and no one comes." Sonic's Sarah Beddoe cautioned against jumping on the latest social platform just because it feels like everyone else is there.

  • Throwback Thursday: Nike ads just did it

    The words "Nike" and "advertising" are as likely to evoke super-star athletes -- from Michael Jordan to Tiger Woods -- as they are inspirational paeans to striving and sweating. But a look back at classic Nike ads this throwback Thursday reveals a few surprises. "Just do it," one of the all-time classic slogans, is as core to the Nike brand as the shoe itself. But the tag, created by Wieden+Kennedy co-founder Dan Wieden, didn't hit the air until 1988. Featuring a real-life octogenarian marathoner, the spot was completely celeb-free.